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· 5 min read
Kevin Williams

This is the third article in a 10 article series: Blazor vs Flutter.

  1. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 1 (Overview)
  2. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 2 (Project Setup)
  3. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 3 (Package Installation) (You are here)
  4. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 4 (Components & Pages)
  5. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 5 (State Management)
  6. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 6 (Navigation)
  7. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 7 (API Requests)
  8. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 8 (Authentication)
  9. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 9 (Deployment)
  10. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 10 (Multi-Platform)

· 7 min read
Kevin Williams

This is the second article in a 10 article series: Blazor vs Flutter.

  1. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 1 (Overview)
  2. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 2 (Project Setup) (You are here)
  3. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 3 (Package Installation)
  4. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 4 (Components & Pages)
  5. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 5 (State Management)
  6. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 6 (Navigation)
  7. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 7 (API Requests)
  8. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 8 (Authentication)
  9. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 9 (Deployment)
  10. Blazor vs Flutter - Part 10 (Multi-Platform)

· 6 min read
Kevin Williams

I first tried Flutter back in 2018, prior to the first major release. Then, a year or so later (if I remember correctly), I came across Blazor. Both platforms have come a long way since then, and I've seen several "Blazor vs Flutter" posts, which give some pros and cons, but no in-depth comparison of the development experience between the two.

That's why I thought I would start this series of posts. First, I'll take a look at various features of both frameworks. Then I'll go into the setup process to compare what's needed to get started with each. Finally, I'll make the same app using both Blazor and Flutter, implementing a variety of common features such as state management, authentication, and api requests. So, let's get started!

· 4 min read
Kevin Williams

One way to improve application performance is to use a cache of some sort. This could include caching websites on a server closer to the user's location, caching regularly used data for faster access, and more. For large applications you may be able to utilize something like Redis or Azure, but other times a simple in-memory cache could work as well.

In one project I'm working on, I'm using an authorization policy that only passes when a user has a certain role attached to their token. The token only provides the role's ID, so I need to read the role from the database. Due to the fact that this could happen frequently, and roles won't be changing often, if at all, I thought cache would be a good way to speed up the authorization checks.

.Net's MemoryCache class is a nice, simple to use solution in this case.

· 2 min read
Kevin Williams

Good morning, and welcome to my weekly DevLog! This week I completed a small amount on FarmCraft, but also took a slight break to work on a custom CRM & project management app that I hope will help me keep track of things as I start getting into more consulting work.

· 6 min read
Kevin Williams

Last week at Microsoft Build, they announced that .Net MAUI was now GA, although you still need the preview version of Visual Studio to create and build the projects. Regardless, I thought it would be a good time to try it out, and decided to do so with a simple encryption helper program.

The program will be able to encrypt or decrypt text with a given RSA key, as well as generate a public / private key pair. Future versions may have other capabilities, but I figured this would be a good place to start.

· 3 min read
Kevin Williams

Good morning, and welcome to my weekly DevLog! This week, my main accomplishments were adding search functionality to my website, and getting authentication working on the FarmCraft web portal.

· 7 min read
Kevin Williams

Not long after getting my site set up, I decided that I wanted to have an easy way to search for things, especially considering that the site serves as my knowledge base for tech-related topics.

There was a simple way to get started with Docusaurus, since it has built-in support for Algolia DocSearch. I had some issues with going that route though:

  1. I wanted to customize the appearance / functionality of the search component
  2. I wanted to better understand how the search worked
  3. My site's repo isn't public, so it wouldn't qualify for the free DocSearch application

And thus started my journey to manually integrate my site with Algolia.